Open the Door to Material Optimization

Introduction:

The world is evolving at a quantum speed with transforming technology. The human life cycle has enriched to tend towards advancement in every sector. Businesses have adopted the transformation & obtained the benefits of technology involved in their mainframe process to become multi-billion companies. Making the product a hero in every story, Engineering the product or designing a physical product demands focus on four major factors; Design, Analysis, Manufacturing, and Materials. Though the first three factors are digitally transformed, the materials field is still lagging. This article exclusively focuses on optimizing your right material choices.

Let’s start with an example of a company facing a similar conundrum.

Background:

Referring to the case of an OEM, that manufactures an industry renowned product.

Due to the stringent industry standards and to stay ahead of the competition, the company decided to optimize their existing product and its performance. Following the advancement, they relied on simulation results for quick feedback from different design iterations. Furthermore, parametric optimization yielded them even better results compared to the manual design iterations. Overall, they were able to achieve a 9% Reduction in Weight and a 5 % Increase in Efficiency through Design Optimization.

Much to the Team’s surprise, the product manager wasn’t satisfied with this result. Hence, he assembled his team to initiate an experiment with different material types. 

The broader idea of this activity was to understand how he could improve his product and cut down costs to the company, thereby naming this activity as Material optimization.

Optimized Product = Design Optimization + Material optimization

Following the superior’s directive, the team started dedicating their efforts to bring the best out of current results, in terms of cutting costs, reducing development time & raising standards of performance. Four of his team members heading the R & D were investigating the case study with different ideas as below. 

The first member tried to use the existing available material data with him to see if he can get the best possible combination;

The second member tried to use the materials preferred by his company to avoid supply chain issues;

The third member tried to reach out to suppliers/consultants for a piece of advice on material choices; and

The fourth member tried to browse on the internet for material data.

However, none of the above approaches answered the below questions

  1. Which material to choose?
  2. Is there a better material choice available?
  3. Is there a cheaper solution? 
  4. Is the chosen data, reliable?
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This is where companies need a tool like, Granta Selector which does answer the above questions.

Granta Selector is a tool that can help optimize your material choices, which not only has material properties of metals, plastics, polymers, ceramics and various other classes of materials but also has features like search, plot and compare your choice of materials as shown in the pic.

Apart from the features mentioned above, Granta selector has:

  • FE export tool to export simulation ready material data to most of the FE platforms
  • synthesizer tool to estimate material and process cost 
  • Eco Audit tool to estimate the environmental impact of the selected material at the early stage of the design.

To use how to use above-mentioned tools, click here to understand how Tecumseh, a global leader of commercial refrigeration compressors used Granta Selector to reduce development time by three-fold and saved millions of euros of cost savings from making the right materials decisions.

please click here for more information on Material optimization.

Please feel free to connect with us at marketing@cadfem.in or +91-9849998435, for a quick Demo on this Product.

Author Bio:

Mr. Gokul Pulikallu, Technical Lead-South

CADFEM India

Mr. Gokul Pulikallu has done his Bachelor of Technology  & he is carrying 9 years of experience in the field of structural Mechanics simulation and optimization. His main focus is Design Optimization & Material Optimization and helps customers adopt these technologies efficiently.

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How Fatigue Made Me Fall From The Chair?

This article explains the setup of a simple fatigue analysis in ANSYS Workbench using an example. For beginners, this article demystifies fatigue analysis.

Context

When I was ten years old, I was fond of a chair which was small and easily movable. After school, I used to sit on it and watch Aladdin tales on the television. One day, as usual, I sat on it. Suddenly the chair got broke in half and I fell on the floor in front of my sister. For obvious reasons, I got embarrassed and my sister made fun of me the whole day. I slept that day with few unanswered questions.

Why did the chair fail when it was working fine for a few years? Why didn’t it fail on the first day I sat on it?

Illustration of a broken chair as a result of fatigue
My broken chair! 🙁

Motivation

Fast forward to my engineering days, I was told that cyclic loading on any structure can make that structure fail – fatigue failure. Only then I could understand why my beloved chair failed.

Many of you might have heard stories like the one mentioned above or even experienced it yourself. However, the fact that majority of structures irrespective of their size experience a phenomenon like fatigue is real. If a simple structure with a simple load cycle could fail because of fatigue, imagine a complex structure with a complex loading cycle. Yes, the consequences are catastrophic for the manufacturer as well as the user.

According to NBS report, “between 80-90 % of all structural failures occur through a fatigue mechanism.” Incorporating fatigue simulation upfront into the product development cycle plays a vital role in optimizing the structural integrity of your product and it significantly reduces the cost of failure.

In this article, a simple fatigue analysis is shown which was carried out using ANSYS Fatigue Tool. If you wish to conduct the analysis as per FKM guidelines, you’ll be interested this CADFEM ANSYS Extension.

Workflow

For a fatigue analysis, static structural or transient analysis is a prerequisite. To achieve this, I consider a simple chair geometry for static structural analysis; appropriate loads and boundary conditions were defined. I define a point mass of 75 kg to act on the chair. This loading can be considered as a misuse for a child’s chair. Resultant static stress (24 MPa) did not exceed the yield strength (54 MPa) of the assigned material.

There! I got the answer to one of the questions from my story. The chair didn’t fail on the first day I sat on it because the load applied on the first day was not sufficient enough to exceed the yield strength of the material.

Analysis setup for fatigue study
Loads and Boundary Conditions

Results of static structural analysis before fatigue analysis
Equivalent von-Mises Stress

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Setting up the analysis

Subsequent to the setup of static structural analysis, I launch the ANSYS Fatigue Tool using the following steps.

Setting up fatigue analysis
Solution>Insert>Fatigue>Fatigue tool

Analysis Type

ANSYS Fatigue Tool offers two methods to calculate fatigue life.

  • Strain Life
  • Stress Life

While strain life approach is widely used, at present, because of its ability to characterize low cycle fatigue (<100,000 cycles), stress life approach addresses high cycle fatigue (>100,000 cycles).

Specifying details in the fatigue tool
Details View of Fatigue tool

I chose the stress life approach to execute this example and subsequently I defined the appropriate S-N (Stress–Cycles) curve in the engineering data.

Loading Type

Contrary to static stress, fatigue damage occurs when stress at a point changes over time. Therefore, it is essential to define the way the load could repeat after a single cycle, in other words the type of fatigue loading determines how the load repeats over time.

Accordingly, I chose zero-based loading type for the current example, which means I apply the load and remove it, thereby resulting in an equivalent load ratio of 0. For a fully-reversed loading, I would apply a load and then apply an equal and opposite load which will result into a load ratio of -1.

Applying zero-based loading in fatigue analysis
Zero-Based loading

In both the cases the amplitude of load remains constant. Therefore looking at the single set of simulation results will give you an idea where fatigue failure might occur.

Mean Stress Theory

Now that I have defined analysis and loading types, I need to choose a mean stress theory.

Zero Mean Stress loading for fatigue analysis
Zero Mean Stress loading

Mean stress is the average of maximum and minimum stress during the fatigue load cycle. Mostly, fatigue data is assumed for zero mean stress, which means fully reversed loading. However, fully reversed loading conditions (zero mean stress) are rarely met in engineering practice. Hence Mean Stress Correction Theory has to be chosen to account for mean stress.

For stress life approach: If experimental data at different mean stresses exist, I can account for the mean stress directly by interpolating different material curves. However, it is unlikely to have experimental data at all mean stresses. Therefore, several empirical relations are available including Goodman, Soderberg and Gerber theories which use static material properties (yield strength and tensile strength) and S-N data to account for mean stress. In general, I don’t advise you to use empirical relations if multiple mean stress data (S-N curves) exists.

Different Mean Stress Theories for Fatigue Analysis
Different mean stress correction theories (Goodman Theory is highlighted)

Goodman Mean Stress Theory is a common choice for plastic materials, whereas Gerber Theory is a common choice for ductile metals. For the current analysis, I chose the Goodman Theory.

Fatigue Life

Like any other result in ANSYS Workbench, fatigue life can be scoped on a geometric entity. For stress life with constant amplitude loading, life at that point will be used if the equivalent alternating stress is lower than the lowest alternating stress defined in the S-N curve

For this example, 3,100,000 cycles is the expected life of the chair. This means that a person of 75 kg can sit on this child’s chair for 3.1 million times. If he ignores and continues to sit beyond the expected life, very soon he might face the same fate as the boy in the story.

Fatigue life extracted from ANSYS Fatigue Module
Fatigue life extracted from ANSYS Fatigue Tool

Conclusion

Wasn’t it easy? Yes, it is easy to perform this analysis provided you have the material data. In case you are not aware, ANSYS Mechanical Pro, Premium, Enterprise and ANSYS AIM offer ANSYS Fatigue Tool.

What are you waiting for? Start realizing your product promise using ANSYS products.

P.S. Just in case you were wondering what happened after the chair broke, my mother bought us a brand new chair the next day!

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