Hybrid Solving Methods for Effective Antenna Placement

In a previous article, I mentioned about design & analysis of antenna using electromagnetic simulation and important aspects to be considered. In this article, I explain effect of a platform on radiation characteristics and how hybrid solving methods can help towards effective antenna placement.

It has become routine for automotive OEMs to integrate different types of antennas in their vehicles. In recent years, many industry professionals have been focusing on implementing projects related to Internet of Things (IoT). There’s ever-growing demand for IoT integration for consumer electronics, vehicles and so on. Consequently, estimating actual performance of the antenna with any platform (vehicles, electronic devices and buildings) is becoming challenging!

In recent years, automotive industry is introducing Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) for automating and enhancing the vehicle system and its safety. The growing interest for wireless connectivityHybrid Solving Methods relies more and more on integrated antenna solutions customized for optimal system performance, and any failure can cause the delay in a critical product launch. ANSYS provides the technology for the various solution techniques for simulating individual antenna to final placement for estimating various characteristics.

Hybrid Solving Methods for Antenna Placement

You can easily assess the effect of the platform on the performance of the antenna using Hybrid Solving Methods. You can apply traditional approaches such as the finite element method (FEM), Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) to problems of moderate electrical size.  Significant computational resources are necessary for these numerical methods. Therefore, we will need to further extend the capability of FEM to the solution of electromagnetic radiation and scattering problems. These could involve disjoint obstacles such as reflector antenna systems, antennas mounted on large platforms, and antennas in the presence of radome structures. To achieve this, several methods such as method of moments (MoM), high frequency techniques such as Physical Optics (PO) and Shooting & Bouncing Rays (SBR+) have been hybridized with FEM.

Furthermore, the below schematic will allow you to select an appropriate solution technique based on the geometric & material complexity and electrical size of the problem that you wish to solve.

Hybrid Solving Methods
Decision Criteria for Selecting Hybrid Solving Methods (Courtesy: ANSYS, Inc.)

Hybrid Solving Methods provide the solution for

  • Radiation Patterns of the Antenna after mounting it on the proposed platform
  • Coupling between Antennas placed on the platform.
  • Optimal Position for an Antenna over given platform.
  • Faster Computation Times
Finite Element Boundary Integral (FEBI) & SBR+

Among the several hybrid solving methods, I’ll focus on FEBI and SBR+ in this section. In both these methods, you simulate a part of the antenna with FEM. Then, you simulate the platform effects with either integral equations or high frequency techniques. To effectively calculate currents near the antenna, you need to analyze the antenna using the FEM and feed these results into FEBI or SBR+ methods.

In general, electrically large problems could be solved with FEBI technique & electrically larger problems can be solved with SBR+ technique. For a smaller problem scope, FEM will do the trick! Since both the hybrid methods are equally applicable for many problems, you’ll need to be aware of the subtle reasons for selecting the most appropriate method that is relevant to the platform. We can help you with this if you need any assistance!

The combined simulation with feed network analysis is also possible with the help of ANSYS Circuit Simulator. With this, you can interface field solver results with those from FEM-Hybrid Techniques.

Relevance to ADAS Applications

When we think about non-monitored drivingHybrid Solving Methods, the ADAS system can handle all the situations: partial or full scenarios. Toyota President Aikido Toyoda recently said to ensure ADAS system safety, we need 8.8 billion miles of testing of autonomous vehicle design. This is not only expensive, but also impractical. ANSYS-Powered Simulations have a crucial role in ADAS because of availability of multiple software tools for different kinds of analysis and easy integration with others.

You can simulate Radar Antennas in Autonomous Vehicles with HFSS and conduct initial placement simulation with hybrid methods (FEBI or SBR+). We can simulate different driving scenarios that accounts for other vehicles, buildings, trees etc. by including detailed physics. This is possible by using HFSS SBR+. These virtual test results can be used to test & validate control algorithms and vehicle dynamics.

Summary

ANSYS Electromagnetic Simulation Software provide the necessary requisites to validate design and placement of the antennas for different applications. In addition, Hybrid Solving techniques provide for various benefits including faster computation times, optimal position studies among others.

Going a step further, you can extend these studies to ADAS applications by integrating results from ANSYS Electronics Simulation Software.

I hope the article was useful to you. If you wish, you can download a recent Webinar on Antenna Design and Placement using ANSYS Software. Of course, please feel free to reach out to me if you have any questions.

Share this on:

ANSYS 18.0 – The latest release is here!

Banner for ANSYS 18.0 software release

The day has arrived!! Most of our customers would’ve received announcement of the latest release – ANSYS 18. It’s time to rejoice and celebrate this new release.

ANSYS 18.0 ushers in the era of pervasive engineering simulation – an era where all types of engineers use simulation throughout the entire product lifecycle. While simulation was once the primary domain of experts and used mainly for verification, it is now moving upfront in the development process to quickly evaluate changes in design. At the same time, it’s also moving downstream of the product lifecycle process to analyze real-time operational data from connected machines in the industrial internet.

By incorporating simulation into all segments of a product’s lifecycle, ANSYS 18.0 adds tremendous value by spurring innovation, reducing development and operational costs, and improving time to market. Whether your field is structures, fluids, electromagnetics, semiconductors, systems, embedded software or some multiphysics combination of these areas, ANSYS 18.0 is the simulation platform to achieve your engineering and business goals.

Digital Launch Event

To learn more about pervasive engineering simulation and ANSYS 18.0, we invite you to the digital launch event on January 31. During this event, the ANSYS CEO, Ajei Gopal, and numerous technology leaders from industry will talk about this exciting new release from ANSYS. Here’s the line-up of the speakers from ANSYS:

  • Ajei Gopal, President and CEO, ANSYS, Inc.
  • Andre Bakker, Senior Director Fluids Development, ANSYS, Inc.
  • Dale Ostergaard, Senior Director Software Development, ANSYS, Inc.
  • Larry Williams, Senior Director Electronics Products, ANSYS, Inc.
  • Sergey Polstyanko, Senior Director, Research and Development, ANSYS, Inc.
  • Eric Bantegnie, Vice President and GM Systems Business Unit, ANSYS, Inc.

In addition, you can also learn more about ANSYS 18.0 by visiting the “What’s New” section of the Customer Portal.

Current Customers – Next Steps

Current customers can download ANSYS 18.0 from the Download Center on the ANSYS customer portal.

You need a license manager upgrade to run ANSYS 18.0 products. Your current license keys will continue to function with the new 18.0 license manager. Support for operating systems, graphics cards, third-party CAD products and more is available on the Platform Support page.

If you need any support, please feel free to contact us.

Together with ANSYS, we are excited to bring you this latest release. This comes as the result of countless hours of work by 1,000+ professionals in the research and development organization. We believe it will exceed your expectations and provide considerable value in your engineering processes and product lifecycle.

May the force always be with you! 🙂

Share this on:

Electromagnetic Simulation for Antennas

In this first part of a multi-part series, I will discuss many aspects of antenna design & analysis with the underlying theme of electromagnetic simulation-driven product development. In this part, I will briefly talk about performing stand-alone Antenna Design, Analysis & Optimization using Electromagnetic Simulation.

Increasing Importance of Electromagnetic Simulation (EM)

While still in university, I imagined antenna design to be very simple. Based on the given frequency, we will need to calculate dimensions and then fabricate the design. That’s it. A decade ago, I found simulation to appear like dark art or black magic. If the fabricated antenna did not work well, I needed to iterate the physical design till it gave good results.

During the recent years, several EM simulation tools have emerged to evaluate the exact solution of Maxwell Equations for estimating the electromagnetic behavior of the devices. These tools used underlying methods like Finite Element Method (FEM), Method of Moments (MoM) and Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD). Generally, we can divide the part components of the electronic design into active and passive devices. The modelling of the active devices is based on nonlinear measurement data parameters like S-parameters and X-parameters. When we come across modelling of passive devices, they are very simple because of their linear nature. However, it is important to understand the limitations of those devices.

The main role of the simulation is for to engineers to be able to accurately predict how complex products will behave in real-world environment enabling the complete virtual prototyping. ANSYS HFSS, a state-of-the-art high-frequency electromagnetic simulation, helps to estimate the radiation characteristics of the antenna and optimize the design as per requirement.

Parameters To Be Considered For Antenna Simulation

In general, engineers know that dimension can be reduced by increasing the substrate dielectric constant. Using standardized equations, we can estimate the size of the patch. However we cannot estimate radiation characteristics among a few other quantities. Using simulation tools, we can replace physical iterations with virtual iterations; we can identify the optimal design that matches the required specifications.

Why do some engineers get different results? Is there anything else that needs to be considered? Yes, engineers who focus only on model dimensions and not on boundaries and excitation will obtain inaccurate results.

Modeling and Setup

Let me consider the example of a GPS antenna that needs to have a gain of 3.5dB. For this gain, we’ll need to identify a antenna design with the smallest possible antenna dimension.

Let’s look at three substrates RT Duriod 5880, FR4 and Alumina. Using ANSYS HFSS, you can model the full antenna by using in-built modeling options or import the design from external CAD software. Initial dimensions of the patch are calculated using standard formulas available in academic literature.

Image of 3D CAD model of a patch antenna before performing electromagnetic simulation
Antenna Model

Patch antennas can be fed power by various methods such as microstrip line or coaxial/SMA. While using coaxial input, many don’t consider the dimensions of the coaxial. A good engineer initially checks for the dimensions of the coax in order to get the characteristic impedance, which directly affects the frequency of operation and voltage standing wave ratio or VSWR.

For assignment of different materials for model, HFSS has an inbuilt material library where you can select the required material for substrate, conductors, etc. If you want to use a material which is not in the library or if you want to add some frequency-dependent properties, then you can modify or create a new material.

Image of Materials available in HFSS before performing electromagnetic simulation
HFSS Material Library
Image showing addition/modification of materials before performing electromagnetic simulation
New Material Creation

For antenna design, radiation is another important boundary in order to accurately estimate the EM emission. As a good practice, the distance of at least λ/4 or λ/8 must be maintained between the antenna and the boundary. For example, λ/4 will be a good distance for radiation boundary and λ/8 for PML boundary. This is an important aspect that many engineers fail to consider. Upon completion of the initial setup, I ran the simulation to check for its performance.

Parameterization of Antenna

After simulation, check the input electric field in coaxial and the impedance of the transmission line/coax in order to verify the expected excitation. In post-processing, do check important parameters for radiation characteristics like pattern and gain. Even the near field data, which is complex to obtain from measurement, can be estimated with simulation.

Since we are not considering any fringing field and probe effects, there will be variation of results. To further improve the design, I suggest using optimization algorithms such as Optimetrics or ANSYS optiSLang. Such tools also permit sensitivity of the design due to fabrication tolerances.

The available optimetrics options in HFSS
Optimetrics in HFSS
Image describes the effect on resonance frequency due to probe position variations while performing electromagnetic simulation
Probe position effect on resonance frequency
Optimal Design of Antenna

Finally, the best design can be selected after evaluating the gain characteristics of the all variations. For the three substrates, I evaluated the optimized dimensions of the patch using Optimetrics:

  • 12.5 x 10 cm² for Duroid
  • 9.5 x 7.5 cm² for FR4
  • 7 x 5 cm² for Alumina
Image shows the estimated gain plot for different substrate materials while performing electromagnetic simulation
Gain Variation vs Substrate

Per this, antenna with FR4 substrate meets the required gain of 3.5dB with the least possible dimension. Better performance can be obtained by varying other parameters such as height of the substrate, etc.

The next time you perform electromagnetic simulation of antenna, do remember to consider all the boundaries.

This concludes the first part of a multi-part series on antenna design & analysis. In the next part, I will discuss about antenna placement analysis.

If you have any questions, please feel free to comment or fill out the contact form.

Share this on: